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Week 7: Presentations

This week we talked about digital presentations and what to look out for when creating & giving them.

Resources

Prezi_logo_transparent_2012Firstly, let’s have a look at different kinds of presentation recourses available: The most common programs for creating digital presentations are Microsoft’s Powerpoint, OpenOffice’s Impress and Apple’s Keynote. A few less known, but still powerful online tools are GoogleDocs, SlideShare and Prezi, which we will be using for our second assignment.

Then, there is Mozilla’s Popcorn Maker for creating Mash-Ups of various types of media (video, audio, images), and Screenr, which is a web-based screen recorder and can be used for recording those Mash-Ups!

Creating Presentations

Now that you have various tools at your disposal, you can start designing your presentation. You should make sure your presentation follows a clear structure so it is easy to follow and will engage the audience.

  1. Set the scene. Give the audience a short overview of your presentation: What is the topic, why is it important to talk about it, and why are you in particular talking about it?
  2. Craft the key message. This can be either informative (you aim to deliver knowledge, so the key message is the most important message) or persuasive (you aim to convince the audience, so the key message is the reaction you want to trigger)
  3. Identify the audience’s questions. The body of your presentation should serve to answer the top questions the audience has after hearing your key message.
  4. Write assertions to answer the audience’s questions in a convincing and concise way. Back up your assertions by stories, statistics, endorsement and/or explanations.
  5. All the content should lead back to the key message. End your presentation with, again, summarizing the topic with the most important message and create an impact.

Good luck!


Image Source: prezi.com

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